The Journalistic View

Tips for Women Truckers

Women have been trucking since 1929 when Lillie Drennan became the first woman to get her CDL.


Since then, an increasing number of women have worked owner-operator trucking alongside their male counterparts. However, the truth is women still have an uphill battle in the trucking industry. Check out the following list of tips to help you do your best and get ahead as a woman trucker.

Bridge the Confidence Gap
Numerous studies have shown men generally take more risks than women, are more likely to ask for promotions, and tend to go for opportunities more confidently. This is often referred to as the “confidence gap.” Interestingly, these studies also found when women did go after opportunities they performed just as well as men. One of the most important things you can do as a woman is to believe in yourself and be confident.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help
It’s natural to want to prove yourself and to get the job done without any assistance. However, male truckers don’t hesitate to ask for help when they need it, whether it’s from dispatch, maintenance, or out on the road. When you work with a trucking company, you have an entire team and resources at your disposal. They are there to help you get the job done. Not using your available resources only makes a tough job even tougher.

Keep Yourself Safe
The sad truth is, as a woman you have to take special care with personal safety. For instance, don’t park on on-ramps but do park near lights in parking lots. Carry yourself with confidence at truck stops and try not to run late at night. When parked for the night, you can thread your seatbelt through the door handle and fasten it. It’ll slow down anyone trying to get in.

Keep these tips in mind both for performance and safety.







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